Upcoming ACOM Event Calendar

October 2008

Webinar
October 16, 2008
1:00 PM EDT
Revenue Management

November 2008

Idea Network
November 20, 2008
1:00 PM EST
All Tracks: Current Trends of the Industry

January 2009

2009 Annual Conference
January 9-11, 2009
New Orleans, Louisiana
Westin New Orleans


A special thank you to the Annual Conference Sponsors:

GOLD






BRONZE


Don’t miss the opportunity to have your name listed above. If you have any questions or are interested in sponsoring ACOM, please contact ACOM Headquarters.


Transfer Calls Without Angering Customers

What's more annoying than being on hold? Waiting for someone to assist you? How about having your phone call transferred—numerous times? And you can bet when you utter the words “transfer your call” to customers, they automatically grow frustrated. Alleviate customers' anxiety by following these guidelines:

Know the details. You must understand customers' issues before you know who to transfer them to. And don't just transfer calls because you don't want to be bothered. Instead, gather the facts and then say “I am going to transfer you to someone who can better resolve your issue.”

Always ask permission. Never transfer calls without asking first. Say “Is it OK if I transfer you?” If customers say “No,” tell them you'll take down their complaints and deliver them to the people who can address them. Then see that you do.

Explain why you are transferring them. They'll wonder “Where am I being transferred?” or “How can they help me?” Offer that information before customers ask. Say: “Is it OK if I transfer you to the sales manager? He has the authority to...”

Provide them with names and numbers of both you and the person you're transferring them to. If they accidentally are disconnected, they can call back and ask for someone by name.

Send them to people who are available to take calls. Stay with calls, making sure that people, not voice mail, pick up.

Offer brief explanations to the people you transfer the call to, including customers' names and situations. When transferred, customers can be greeted by name and they won't need to repeat themselves, which reduces their frustration.

— Adapted from First-Rate Customer Service http://www.douglaspublications.com/briefings/trial_newsletter_NEY2FR.asp

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